Miami New Times 05-05-2016 : Page 38

miaminewtimes.com miaminewtimes.com | LIVE WIRE | ▼ Music Rolling Loud Festival | music | cafe | film | art | Stage | Night+Day | metro | riptiDe | letterS | coNteNtS | | MUSIC | CAFE | FILM | ART | STAGE | NIGHT+DAY | METRO | RIPTIDE | LETTERS | CONTENTS | WITH FUTURE, YOUNG THUG, AND OTHERS. 5 P.M. FRIDAY, MAY 6, AND NOON SATURDAY, MAY 7, AT MANA WYNWOOD, 318 NW 23RD ST., MIAMI; 305-573-0371; MANAWYNWOOD.COM. TICKETS COST $100 TO $10,000 VIA ROLLINGLOUD.COM. Last year, Dope Entertainment’s inaugu-ral Rolling Loud Festival was a shitshow. Though the impressive lineup included hip-hop heavy hitters such as Action Bronson, A$AP Ferg, Juicy J, and Schoolboy Q, the festival was plagued by negative forces both in its control (production, planning, and customer service) and out of its control (rain that flooded the floors of Soho Studios). Sadly, expectations were not met, and Rolling Loud was not as enjoyable as most attendees expected. It seemed like it rained more that day in South Florida than it does during hurricane season, causing delays in performances on the main stage, frizz to freshly done hairstyles, and damage to everyone’s kicks. But this year, cofounders of Dope Entertainment — Matt Zingler and Tariq Cherif — say the second-annual Rolling Loud Festival will be better than last year’s. To start, the two have a stronger plan to deal with inclement weather. Last year, thanks to the rain, a few independent art-ists didn’t get a chance to perform, sets on the main stage were pushed back, and everyone was just soaking wet — and not in a good way. But Cherif says that this time, they’ll have a tent to end all tents. “We’re bringing in a structure so big, I wouldn’t call it tent,” he says. Security will be beefed up too, Cherif says. “We’re using the same security and ticketing company as Ultra to ensure entry and exit will be a lot smoother.” Zingler and Cherif are confident that the long lines that plagued last year’s fest won’t be an issue in 2016. Inside, performances will run smoother too, they hope. “The stages will have alternating set times so people will have plenty of time to get something TV. There were Spike Lee movies. You had Public Enemy and A Tribe Called Quest on the radio. On every front, there was a movement of con-sciousness and diversity.” But that golden era didn’t last long enough for Speech. “In 1995, things changed. Labels promoted street culture over consciousness. Wu-tang, Biggie, and Nas were promoted with their stories of street thugs and hustlers.” Speech grew up in Milwaukee, where his dad owned a nightclub, and would often stop by after school to watch the DJs do their thing. He eventually took up DJing himself, and after moving south to attend the Art Institute of At-lanta in 1988, Speech put up a flyer looking to form a rap group. One day, he noticed someone look-ing at the flyer, so he approached. That man would turn out to be Headliner, the cofounding mem-ber of Arrested Development. “That was the beginnings. We’d Photo by Ralph Pierre invite African drummers and dancers onstage with us, and that Dope Entertainment founders Matt Zingler (left) and Tariq Cherif are ready for another Rolling Loud. became Arrested Development.” to drink, use the bathroom, and meet up It didn’t take long for the group with their friends between each set.” to find success both critically and commer-Brew at the Zoo, With Arrested Development But perhaps the most painful issue at the cially, selling 4 million albums. Not only soul-first Rolling Loud was the sound quality. It ful, Arrested Development was also political 8 P.M. SATURDAY, MAY 7, AT ZOO MIAMI, 12400 SW was sludgy and barely audible. Schoolboy in ways popular music rarely attempts to be 152ND ST., MIAMI; 305-251-0400; ZOOMIAMI.ORG. Q even addressed it during his set in a fit of anymore. But Speech isn’t done yet. This year, TICKETS COST $25 TO $80 VIA TICKETFLY.COM. frustration. “I don’t know what’s going on he released two very different records the With a focus on the positive and political in with production, but they crushing my whole same day with Arrested Development: Chang-the early ’90s, Arrested Development was vibe,” he told he crowd. Zingler and Cherif ing the Narrative and This Was Never Home . often brought up in defense of hip-hop when-agree that the production last year wasn’t the “ Changing the Narrative is very sampled ever the mainstream media demonized rap as best. The two say they have taken steps to en-and poetic,” he says. “We sample music we’re the soundtrack of so-called gangsters. With sure that problem doesn’t happen again. “The hits like “Tennessee,” “People Everyday,” listening to like Chicago, James Brown, and sound will be much better, and the visuals the Gorillaz. This Was Never Home is drum-and “Mr. Wendell,” Arrested Development will be better than last year. The production machine-and-technology-oriented and delivered Afrocentric messages over Sly & the overall will be better quality,” Cherif says.. Family Stone samples to people of all cultures. influenced by Kendrick Lamar and Drake.” We’re eager to give Rolling Loud a sec-The current seven-member lineup of Todd Thomas, the founder and frontman of ond chance. When you’re dealing with Arrested Development will take some of Arrested Development who’s better known by first-year festivals, shit happens, and that’s those new songs — and some old ones — his stage name Speech, is glad his music lives just a fact of festival life. And if there’s to the stage at Miami New Times ’ Brew on today. “The late ’80s and early ’90s was not one genre of music in Miami that needs a at the Zoo this Saturday. DAVID ROLLAND only a golden era of hip-hop; it was a renais-strong ally, it’s hip-hop. Here’s hoping Roll-sance for blacks in all art forms,” he says. “Bill Music@MiamiNewTimes.com ing Loud can be that ally. CRISTINA JEROME Cosby changed the narrative of black reality on 38 38 M ay 5-M ay 11, 2016 M ONTH XX–M ONTH XX, 2008 MiaMi New TiMes MIAMI NEW TIMES

Live Wire

Rolling Loud Festival

WITH FUTURE, YOUNG THUG, AND OTHERS. 5 P.M. FRIDAY, MAY 6, AND NOON SATURDAY, MAY 7, AT MANA WYNWOOD, 318 NW 23RD ST., MIAMI; 305- 573-0371; MANAWYNWOOD.COM. TICKETS COST $100 TO $10,000 VIA ROLLINGLOUD.COM.

Last year, Dope Entertainment’s inaugural Rolling Loud Festival was a shitshow. Though the impressive lineup included hiphop heavy hitters such as Action Bronson, A$AP Ferg, Juicy J, and Schoolboy Q, the festival was plagued by negative forces both in its control (production, planning, and customer service) and out of its control (rain that flooded the floors of Soho Studios).

Sadly, expectations were not met, and Rolling Loud was not as enjoyable as most attendees expected. It seemed like it rained more that day in South Florida than it does during hurricane season, causing delays in performances on the main stage, frizz to freshly done hairstyles, and damage to everyone’s kicks. But this year, cofounders of Dope Entertainment — Matt Zingler and Tariq Cherif — say the second-annual Rolling Loud Festival will be better than last year’s.

To start, the two have a stronger plan to deal with inclement weather. Last year, thanks to the rain, a few independent artists didn’t get a chance to perform, sets on the main stage were pushed back, and everyone was just soaking wet — and not in a good way. But Cherif says that this time, they’ll have a tent to end all tents. “We’re bringing in a structure so big, I wouldn’t call it tent,” he says.

Security will be beefed up too, Cherif says. “We’re using the same security and ticketing company as Ultra to ensure entry and exit will be a lot smoother.” Zingler and Cherif are confident that the long lines that plagued last year’s fest won’t be an issue in 2016. Inside, performances will run smoother too, they hope. “The stages will have alternating set times so people will have plenty of time to get something to drink, use the bathroom, and meet up with their friends between each set.”

But perhaps the most painful issue at the first Rolling Loud was the sound quality. It was sludgy and barely audible. Schoolboy Q even addressed it during his set in a fit of frustration. “I don’t know what’s going on with production, but they crushing my whole vibe,” he told he crowd. Zingler and Cherif agree that the production last year wasn’t the best. The two say they have taken steps to ensure that problem doesn’t happen again. “The sound will be much better, and the visuals will be better than last year. The production overall will be better quality,” Cherif says..

We’re eager to give Rolling Loud a second chance. When you’re dealing with first-year festivals, shit happens, and that’s just a fact of festival life. And if there’s one genre of music in Miami that needs a strong ally, it’s hip-hop. Here’s hoping Rolling Loud can be that ally. CRISTINA JEROME

Brew at the Zoo, With Arrested Development

8 P.M. SATURDAY, MAY 7, AT ZOO MIAMI, 12400 SW 152ND ST., MIAMI; 305-251-0400; ZOOMIAMI.ORG. TICKETS COST $25 TO $80 VIA TICKETFLY.COM.

With a focus on the positive and political in the early ’90s, Arrested Development was often brought up in defense of hip-hop whenever the mainstream media demonized rap as the soundtrack of so-called gangsters. With hits like “Tennessee,” “People Everyday,” and “Mr. Wendell,” Arrested Development delivered Afrocentric messages over Sly & the Family Stone samples to people of all cultures.

Todd Thomas, the founder and frontman of Arrested Development who’s better known by his stage name Speech, is glad his music lives on today. “The late ’80s and early ’90s was not only a golden era of hip-hop; it was a renaissance for blacks in all art forms,” he says. “Bill Cosby changed the narrative of black reality on TV. There were Spike Lee movies. You had Public Enemy and A Tribe Called Quest on the radio. On every front, there was a movement of consciousness and diversity.” But that golden era didn’t last long enough for Speech. “In 1995, things changed. Labels promoted street culture over consciousness. Wu-tang, Biggie, and Nas were promoted with their stories of street thugs and hustlers.”

Speech grew up in Milwaukee, where his dad owned a nightclub, and would often stop by after school to watch the Djs do their thing. He eventually took up Djing himself, and after moving south to attend the Art Institute of Atlanta in 1988, Speech put up a flyer looking to form a rap group. One day, he noticed someone looking at the flyer, so he approached. That man would turn out to be Headliner, the cofounding member of Arrested Development. “That was the beginnings. We’d invite African drummers and dancers onstage with us, and that became Arrested Development.”

It didn’t take long for the group to find success both critically and commercially, selling 4 million albums. Not only soulful, Arrested Development was also political in ways popular music rarely attempts to be anymore. But Speech isn’t done yet. This year, he released two very different records the same day with Arrested Development: Changing the Narrative and This Was Never Home.

“Changing the Narrative is very sampled and poetic,” he says. “We sample music we’re listening to like Chicago, James Brown, and the Gorillaz. This Was Never Home is drum-machine- and-technology-oriented and influenced by Kendrick Lamar and Drake.”

The current seven-member lineup of Arrested Development will take some of those new songs — and some old ones — to the stage at Miami New Times’ Brew at the Zoo this Saturday. DAVID ROLLAND

Music@MiamiNewTimes.com

Read the full article at http://digitalissue.miaminewtimes.com/article/Live+Wire/2475847/301098/article.html.

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